Writing Research Across Borders III

 

Welcome of participants:
Monday 17th, Tuesday 18th February 2014
Conference : 19th to 22nd February 2014
Université Paris-Ouest Nanterre La Défense

  
 
 
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2008
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2011
International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research
               
 
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The new version of the program


Calls for proposals are closed.
 

Following on the writing research conferences in 2008 at the University of California Santa Barbara, and in 2011 at George Mason University in Washington DC, the next conference on writing research across borders will be held in Paris, France, in February, 2014, under the auspices of the newly formed International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research (ISAWR).

The University of Paris-Ouest Nanterre la Défense will host this major scientific event. The conference, which will be held for the first time in Europe, will offer the opportunity for encounters among different writing research traditions.

This Conference brings together the many writing researchers from around the world, drawing on all disciplines, and focused on all aspects of writing at all levels of development and in all segments of society. This conference will be not only an event allowing for dissemination of knowledge established by writing research, but also a space to promote encounters among different approaches to writing, and among different writing research communities. New projects and new collaborations will flourish.

Several key questions will be at the heart of the debates and discussions: what does it mean to write in the 21st century? In these times of multimedia technologies and globalization, in an era where the frontiers are blurring between the intimate and the social, between the private and the professional, what does Writing now mean? How might we respond to major societal challenges and face inequalities in access to writing? Are our currently-available research methodologies and tools up to the task of helping us to better understand what writing is, its functionalities, how it is acquired, its role in personal development, its history?

Contact: Sylvie Plane sylvie.plane@wanadoo.fr
                  Sarah de Vogué sarah.de.vogue@gmail.com
                  Sylvie Niquet sylvie.niquet@univ-lorraine.fr